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  1. Hiroshima Diary: The Journal of a Japanese Physician August 6-September 30 1945 Read Online
  2. Hiroshima Diary by Michihiko Hachiya, Warner Wells | Waterstones
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See what's been added to the collection in the current 1 2 3 4 5 6 weeks months years. Your reader barcode: Your last name:. Cite this Email this Add to favourites Print this page. You must be logged in to Tag Records. In the Library Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. Details Collect From Order a copy Copyright or permission restrictions may apply.

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More filters. Sort order. Sep 04, Petal X rated it it was amazing Shelves: reviews , reviewed , popculture-anthropology , medicine-science , history , travel-adventure-countries , read , star-books. After the bombing of Hiroshima, the author acting as both a doctor and patient in a hospital now devoted to the victims of radiation sickness decided to keep a diary. The attitude of the Japanese to being bombed was one I could not have imagined.

Within a few days there was the "news" that Japan had used nuclear bombs on the West Coast of America, and the cities were destroyed and that the people were either killed or suffering After the bombing of Hiroshima, the author acting as both a doctor and patient in a hospital now devoted to the victims of radiation sickness decided to keep a diary. Within a few days there was the "news" that Japan had used nuclear bombs on the West Coast of America, and the cities were destroyed and that the people were either killed or suffering.

This cheered the patients in the hospital up immensely who wanted greater use of nuclear warheads against America. They were totally devastated up to and including suicide over the decision of the Emperor to cede victory and urged him to revenge their nation, even if they all died. Their thirst for revenge and anger at the Emperor were extreme. Possibly their main regret was that they hadn't done it first.

I mentioned in the Notes on Reading that the author was an extreme misogynist. He felt that the rape of a girl by soldiers was her fault and that it would be best if women just stayed at home as when they were out they were too much of a temptation to some men.


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Now I don't feel sorry for Hiroshima either. Why is it that the victors, if they have an organised military structure, are held to higher standards and blamed for atrocities when the losers and terrorist organisations are not? I really want to write a review of this book, explaining the above statement. The author is a very measured scientific man, but also a misogynist of the most extreme kind. The sufferings of the people as radiation sickness took hold, an illness never seen before so each symptom was new and unexpected, is terrible.

Many died, but many recovered. They were civilians, just like the Germans, but they supported the war and the cruelty of their thoughts towards the enemy, the Allies knew no bounds. View all 18 comments. Sep 04, Smiley aka umberto rated it liked it Shelves: diary , japan. Hachiya has written in his journal like a true academic, in other words, he has recorded everything as a matter of facts, rather than emotions, as we can see from his account on the unimaginably devastating explosion impact by the atomic bomb at 8.

So well does one recall little things that I remember vividly how a stone lantern in the garden became brilliantly lit and I debated whether this light was caused by a magnesium flare or sparks from a passing trolley. Garden shadows disappeared. The view where a moment before all had been so bright and sunny was now dark and hazy. Through swirling dust I could barely discern a wooden column that had supported one corner of my house.

It was leaning crazily and the roof sagged dangerously. Nine days later, his entry on August 15 has revealed the scene and how the victims at the Hiroshima Communications Hospital reacted to the historic radio broadcast from the Emperor: Word came to assemble in the office of the Communications Bureau. A radio had been set up and when I arrived the room was already crowded. I leaned against the entrance and waited.

In a few minutes, the radio began to hum and crackle with noisy static. One could hear an indistinct voice which only now and then came through clearly. My psychic apparatus stopped working, and my tear glands stopped, too. Darkness clouded my eyes, my teeth chattered, and I felt cold sweat running down my back. Finally, the silence was broken by the sound of weeping.

I looked around. There was no look of gallantry here, but rather, the faces of all showed expressions of despair and desperation.

Hiroshima Diary: The Journal of a Japanese Physician August 6-September 30 1945 Read Online

View all 9 comments. Mar 03, Michael rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: history buffs, medical buffs. Shelves: biology-genetics , japan , favorites. This book's the perfect example of my criteria for five-starring something. Not only has it helped me decide that I'm a pacifist a standpoint I'm still pondering but the second half of the book is a medical mystery, which I was not expecting at all.

Hiroshima Diary by Michihiko Hachiya, Warner Wells | Waterstones

In there was very little understanding of radiation poisoning, but Dr. Hachiya's friends and co-workers were dying around him from the aftereffects of the bomb. Not only did he and his diary survi two tags that never go together - or do they? Not only did he and his diary survive, but he lived for decades afterwards Even so, some acts committed by my country shame me, regardless of the ends achieved. View all 5 comments. Aug 21, Michael Havens rated it it was amazing. Here is one of those unusual times when I'm not sure how to approach as subject, much less write a book review on. It's kind of like the times when in high school, I was asked to write an essay on a novel , and found myself rather at a loss or loath to write about it, not because I had nothing to say and to those who know me know that I very rarely am at a loss for words, but that the novel had something so profound to talk about, I felt that it would serve and memorialize the work better by h Here is one of those unusual times when I'm not sure how to approach as subject, much less write a book review on.

It's kind of like the times when in high school, I was asked to write an essay on a novel , and found myself rather at a loss or loath to write about it, not because I had nothing to say and to those who know me know that I very rarely am at a loss for words, but that the novel had something so profound to talk about, I felt that it would serve and memorialize the work better by having others in the class talk about it. I was so interested in hearing what others had to say about it.

This would happen to me with the work, 'Of Mice and Men'. Likewise, I find it difficult to approach this excellent diary about an event so ingrained still into our imaginations and fears to this day, namely, the dropping of the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima, and by extension, the subsequent bombing of Nagasaki, the numerous testing on bigger bombs, the cousin of the atom bomb, the Hydrogen bomb, and the effect on the psyche and culture of the Cold War and beyond.

There is also a desire to respect, by keeping in tact, and not extricating text because of the awe and explicable feelings I may have to any one individual's story, but to respect their narrative without interruption. But what we do have in this work is nearly the hypocenter of the blast which killed between 90,, people. Hachiya lived very close to the hospital where he worked. The Hiroshima Communications Hospital was only about a mile away from the hypocenter, and close enough that his testimony and the variety of the patients, family, workers, and fiends are good enough for us to witness from a focused lens, the devastation, violence, and degradation one bomb had on a community.

I would strongly urge readers not to pass up the introduction. There is a lot of valuable information about the times with which Dr. Hachiya found himself in, as well as the attitudes, told without embellishment as you will find n the work itself from both sides of the Pacific, as well as the socio-political, psychological re-evaluation and changes some Japanese, not the least Dr. Hachiya himself, had to face. It's also important, as mentioned as well in the introduction, of what 'Hiroshima Diary' was not meant for, namely, public consumption.

This was meant to sometimes be a guide to his rounds and what medical and mental issues his patients had. It is also important to keep in mind that while this work does have a definitive chronology, the work speaks more as a tapestry, little patches that work up to the complete picture. Like most eyewitness accounts of this kind, one can only expect that. If we seem to seethe with indignity with Dr. While following his eyes, do we in some way follow our own inner eye at ourselves.

This is the value such remembrances have to the historical record.

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As I said above, this work should not be read for the purposes of sensationalism. We only have to go to our movie theaters today to get million dollar sets to be blown up for the public's new arena addiction. This should be read in the way it was intended, as a human account, as apposed to a personal account. This is not documentation of the theoretical, it is the face of one man, driven to take care of his patients, deal with his own conflicts, and find a peace within a living hell, an unprecedented hell. View 2 comments. Shelves: books-withtoratings , review-liked , y , diary , ww2 , war , favourite , non-fiction , author-male , history.

I looked out of the window, and contemplated the constant uncertainty that British weather tests me with. Particularly this year; the wettest for a century. Dr Hachiya, is not bitter, he does not rage, shout, or condemn. As a result, I found it increasingly difficult to lay this book aside and return to the present day. Though of a desperate sorrow, the pulse of a quiet, practical, serenity lives within and brings life to the pages of this book.

I experienced a certain light-heartedness I had not known for a long time. For the first time I sense that I have gained something of a deeper understanding of the terrible fear engendered by the Cuban Missile Crisis in , to a generation to whom the human and economic devastation wreaked by the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, was as yet within such unspeakably painfully recent living memory. Jan 21, Indi Martin rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-enjoyed. This is a very difficult book for Americans, I think. It doesn't point any fingers of guilt, it is simply a journal, written as it happened, by a doctor who happened to be very close to the epicenter of the Hiroshima bomb.

Lucky to survive at all, this journal is priceless for the descriptions of what ground zero actually looked like, the symptoms of radiation sickness before anyone knew what that was, exactly. The confusion following the bomb. From a medical standpoint which is largely what it This is a very difficult book for Americans, I think. From a medical standpoint which is largely what it is written in , it is brilliant and intriguing.

From a human standpoint, it is devastating and difficult. This is, in my estimation, one of those books that everyone should read. Nov 13, Sara rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. A wonderful recollection of memories from one of the worst moments for mankind. A part of history we shouldn't forget, and must never repeat, told from within by the Director of a Hospital where many of the survivors later died due to the yet unknown effects of nuclear radiation.

In spite of being a hospital's diary about such a terrible matter, the lecture is very entertaining, following the thoughts and investigations carried by all the workers and the few visitors that carried help and suppor A wonderful recollection of memories from one of the worst moments for mankind. In spite of being a hospital's diary about such a terrible matter, the lecture is very entertaining, following the thoughts and investigations carried by all the workers and the few visitors that carried help and support, as well as some news from the rest of the world. A history of devastation and desperation that leaves the reader with the feeling that humans are good by nature despite of the facts , and that human beings can do awesome things, and face any situation, with the help of hope and other people.

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A must-read for any kind of person. May 13, Nick rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , japan , memoirs , wwii , asia , apocalpyse. He then spent the next several months, a doctor, at the local hospital, triaging folks who in their shock from 3rd degree burns and the beginnings of radiation poisoning might have welcomed Voldemart or Peeta as a benevolent alternative. Painful to read and unflinching in its description of the intersection of technology and the immense capacity of human suffering. The atomic bombing of hiroshima is part of the reason why today, young readers seek the literature of distopia for understanding.

Feb 13, Lisa rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Peaceniks and history buffs. Shelves: history-memoir-biography. Devastating first-hand account from a doctor of the immediate aftermath of a nuclear bomb. Gut-wrenching detail: " I discovered that I had tripped over a man's head. Excuse me! Excuse me, please! I cried hysterically!

Not for the squeamish. This book, as some suggest, was not written as an anti-war manifesto. It's political messa Devastating first-hand account from a doctor of the immediate aftermath of a nuclear bomb. It's political message, if any, is subtle. As subtle as thousands of people slowly oozing bodily fluids from every pore can be, anyway.

Oct 14, Michael Phelps rated it it was ok Recommends it for: Doctors who are interested in history. I understand that this book was a diary, not a novel. I understand it was written by a doctor, not a writer. I understand that it was hastily written in Japanese.

I understand it was then translated into English by another doctor with the intent that the language would remain as close to literal translation as possible. I understand that to point out its numerous typos and punctuation errors is a lame thing to do. And I understand its subject matter is perhaps the most horrific example of Okay. And I understand its subject matter is perhaps the most horrific example of what humans have done to other humans. Therefore I can't rag too much on this book. I will simply say it is only moderately bad.

View 1 comment. Dec 24, Ellen rated it liked it Shelves: , academic-reading. While not an uplifting read, I think that this book is a cornerstone for anyone wanting to learn more about the real-life experience of World War 2. For anyone who lightly thinks about nuclear weapons or another full-scale war, this book promises to be a strong deterrent because of the descriptions of regular human suffering that it covers. The attack on Hiroshima hurt innocent people indiscriminately and after reading this book, it becomes highly questionable if the bomb was the right decision.

I first read this book for a history class in college, and found it to be enlightening because throughout my secondary school education in the United States, there was only one perspective presented about Japan's role in World War 2. Here, we see from a primary source how one man encountered the destruction of his city and his responsibility for many who were injured in the aftermath.

This book challenges commonly held perceptions about the Hiroshima bombing, and I believe that it is absolutely crucial for future politicians, military specialists, and diplomats to read. While not written in the most interesting language and often difficult to understand the medical terminology, this book takes a dedicated reader to really appreciate.

Overall, I think that reading this book will inform my future visit to Hiroshima, Japan. This one is difficult to give a star rating. No one should have to go through the types of experiences documented in this diary. I believe at least a portion of this should be required reading in any curriculum covering World War II. I don't think it's enough to just say two atomic bombs were dropped in Japan and then they surrendered—one should go furthe This one is difficult to give a star rating.

I don't think it's enough to just say two atomic bombs were dropped in Japan and then they surrendered—one should go further to truly understand a little about what it meant for those bombs to drop. Jul 22, Barbara rated it it was amazing.