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It just doesn't make sense to not reveal the name for 'protecting the identity of the author' after giving such a detailed life story and other intimate details about her family structure and other stuff. It is naive to assume that she would not be caught and put to death. I guess, maybe it could be the story of the maid of the Princess or something.

Nevertheless I found it to be a highly compelling rea First of all, I do not believe that this work is a genuine autobiography of a Saudi princess. Nevertheless I found it to be a highly compelling read and I believe most of the cruel, barbaric traditions and suffocating rules mentioned in this book are unfortunately true. I had stayed in that terrible place for two years and during that period, I was appalled by their religious extremism and zero tolerance to other religions. But after reading this book I realize they not only spit upon other religions but also treat their own women like shit.

Some of the experiences mentioned are so heart wrenching I am amazed how a human being can treat another another human being in such absolute cruelty and be so merciless. This book is definitely not an easy read but it would give you a pretty accurate insight about inner workings of the Saudi society and about the wretched status of their women. View all 11 comments. As a person who had spent some time in Saudi Arabia as an expatriate, I can say that many elements of this book had indeed lived up to match some of my experiences there.

However, it should be noted with caution that this is a tale that spans many years: back from the time when Saudi Arabia is slowly opening itself up to embrace the world and modernization. The country that I came to, live in and left a few years back was a stark contrast to the hear-say and media portrayal of late. In fact, I w As a person who had spent some time in Saudi Arabia as an expatriate, I can say that many elements of this book had indeed lived up to match some of my experiences there. In fact, I was surprised of how much improved things are in a rather conservative country.

Things have changed for sure. It should be noted that this was a tale being told from the perspective of a Princess, and rewritten by the author. Thus, it is hard to read this book without sensing a tinge of bias especially me knowing her central theme. Or, of how much the story had been rewritten to create a more shocking drama.

You be the judge of the story. Another caution: it is easy to link the injustice, cruelty and oppression depicted in the book, to Muslims and even Islam by first glance. Islam is a religion of the many people around various places in this earth. Saudi Arabia being its birth place - and that's all. Culture varies between one group of people to another, but that does not mean that the religion bear the burden of misinterpretation.

As much as one expect this book to linger so much on elements of faith and religion - it actually dwells more on culture and human value. By all means, it is not to say that Sasson invoke the sentiment in this book. She exhibit great respect for the religion and said so many times through the character and by herself. At pages, the book makes a good read.

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The stories are short, yet engaging enough to grip you for hours. Shocking, sickening at times and sometimes just plain beautiful. Revelation after revelation, which while seems extraordinarily unbelievable, is also true. Saudi Arabia is a beautiful country and the people are kind. This book didn't really focus much on that, and misses a lot on the good parts.

Much have to be learned of he life of the common people. Aug 26, Raven and Beez rated it did not like it. Read on the blog!! Okay, I might be way too harsh with this review but that's only because I have never hated a book more than this one right here. So here goes my rant. This book is said to be about Sultana Not real name who is a Saudi Princess and even though she belongs to the royal family she is bound by strict rules that define that women are only used for sexual relief and to bear the children for their husbands.

And how they are enslaved by their fathers, husbands and brothers. First of Read on the blog!! First of all, what kind of a person who belongs to a family of famous people would want such intimidate details of her life story which is different than others, obviously! Secondly, how is it possible that when such details were put in a book for everyone to read, how did her family not find it out?

The facts in the book are obvious enough for anyone to understand that it's fake. Fact 1: She said that she wasn't allowed to go into the mosque. Being a Saudi Princess she should have known that Mosques have a separate section for women. Fact 2: It's said that women were forced to marry after puberty. I agree that women were and in some places still are being made to marry men right after maturation.

Islam! What are the Veil, Divorce, and Polygamy for?

But it was to avoid going around and having sex before marriage as doing that is unlawful in Islam. But but but I have heard that it's mentioned in the Quran the holy book of Muslims that it is the woman who gets to decide when and whom she wants to marry. Remember that it's always the humans who twist rules to fit their requirement. Fact 3: Woman are given the highest respect in Islam. Women are told to cover themselves so as not to attract the attention of unwanted men but men are not even allowed to look at them with bad intentions as thinking of a bad deed is equal to doing one.

And to support this fact, a quote from the Quran itself translated of course : He who is best to his wife is the best man among you. However, I agree that polygamy is allowed in Islam but I don't think that anybody in the modern generation follows that as everyone knows that it's difficult enough to handle the expenses and lectures of one woman Fact 4: Also a father who educates a minimum of three daughters has gained a palace in Heaven. Fact 5: There is a story kind of thing that I have heard. It's about this man who asks the prophet "Who is the one worthy of more respect after Allah The god worshiped by Muslims?

The man asks one again "Who after that? Once again the man asks "And who after that? For the last time the man asks "Who after that? This does not mean that Fathers are not respected enough, they are but it's just that Mothers are held higher. There are many facts that I can go on about like the one about piercing the vagina or something which is absolutely stupid and I think that the author has just made it up but I just wanted to tell you guys that anyone who believes in this book and let's themselves be manipulated by it, Islam is not a bad religion.

It has given it's followers many rules to follow but it's for their own advantage. Like listening to music and watching movies is not allowed in Islam, it's not forbidden but it's said so as to avoid any thing that takes one away from worshiping their God. I think it's the same for Protestants I heard that like Muslims they too are supposed to cover their heads, not drink, not have sex before marriage, not worship images or idols of God, not listen to music or watch movies and not wear gold. I accept that women are oppressed but anyone would be fool to believe that Islam is a religion that promotes it.

Women of every religion are oppressed by men of different religions. Just because one man from one particular religion does so does not mean that every man of that religion does it. The same goes for Terrorism. So this is what I had to say about this book. Since I hate this one so much I don't think I will be reading the other two that follow this one. And I won't be rating this one since I have nothing to give it, but I won't be stopping you from reading it either. You can read it for yourself and understand that it's the biggest hoax ever. Lots of hatred for the author but love and pasta for you guys, Raven View all 22 comments.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Princess is the story of a Saudi Arabian princess called Sultana for the purposes of the story. It shows a picture of the life of a woman in the male dominated Saudi society. Her brother is treated like a god from birth while she and her sisters are subjected to whatever cruelty he desires. As Sultana gets older, she encounters more and more horror at the treatment of women. Things chance when she is betrothed to Kareem.

Or do they? First of all, this was a homework assignment from my girlfrie Princess is the story of a Saudi Arabian princess called Sultana for the purposes of the story. First of all, this was a homework assignment from my girlfriend at the time. She and my sister in law had both read it and it raised their ire. I said I'd give it a shot, mostly because I knew it would force my brother to have to read it as well.

To put it bluntly, the Saudi women go through some horrible shit. Girls being drowned in a swimming pool for disgracing the family, girls getting stoned to death, raped by their much older husbands, polygamy, etc. It's not the easy reading I'm accustomed to and has raised my awareness of the plight of women in Middle Eastern countries. It's a good read but not a light read and definitely not for the faint of heart.

Male Privilege versus Rawls' Veil of Ignorance

View all 15 comments. Dec 30, Linda rated it it was ok. After reading this book and comments from other readers, i really feel like i need to say something regarding Islam and Muslims because I am a Muslim. To all people who read the book, don't be mislead by what you read. That is not the true picture of Islam. What is portrayed in the story is more of culture-based, not religion Islam particularly. The way the men in the story treated their women is not what is taught in Islam. I know because I am a Muslim, living in a Muslim community.

In Islam, After reading this book and comments from other readers, i really feel like i need to say something regarding Islam and Muslims because I am a Muslim. In Islam, women are respected. In Saudi Arabia, women are treated that way because that's their culture, not because they are following the teaching of Islam. It is true that we, Muslim women, need to cover certain parts of our body. I do it and is not forced to do it. I am not denied the right to educate myself, or to work.

I am an educated person, working in professional field, earning 4 figures monthly, and i am married and me and my husband shares the same responsibility in marriage. So, the point is, please don't generalise Muslims and Islam after reading this book. View all 6 comments. Nov 28, Anastasia Kinderman rated it did not like it Recommends it for: no one. Shelves: islamic-studies.

I am an American who has an interest in both Muslims and Arab countries. I got this book for Christmas. It is a very gripping story, a real page-turner. However, while reading through it I couldn't help noticing that the way the book was written just seemed It read like a novel: the way the chapters were structured, the horrifying crimes committed by the males in the story I'm Note: Comments by Jean Sasson and Friederike Monika Adsani or their fake accounts will automatically be deleted.

It read like a novel: the way the chapters were structured, the horrifying crimes committed by the males in the story I'm not saying horrible things aren't done, I just find it hard to believe that EVERY male in Saudi Arabia is basically a heartless idiot like they are portrayed in this book , and the protagonist's unavoidably American Feminist view of the things happening in her country. I did some research and discovered that apparently the author was sued for plagiarism although, in the interests of being fair, she did win and this book has been accused of basically being a novel claiming to be the truth.

I would have to say I agree with that assessment. It read like a novel. The covers of this book and other books by the same author all have that "fiction sensational novel" type of cover. The titles sound like novel titles. The blurbs written for this and the other books in the trilogy read like blurbs for fictional novels. If you compare it to other books written on the hardships women in the Arab world have faced you can immediately tell a difference in both the writing they do not read like entertaining sensational novels, they read like true stories of hardship and just the covers and blurbs for them other books don't have "fiction book" covers and the blurbs don't read like the blurbs for novels I had no knowledge of the controversy surrounding this book before I read it but after I was done I had enough doubts about its authenticity to research its back story.

That should tell you something. It's painfully obvious in reading through this book that it is fiction. If you are curious and wish to read this novel for yourself I recommend just getting it from your library so you in no way financially support someone who advertises fiction under the guise of truth.

I have checked out her other books and it seems the author is simply attempting to profit from our curiosity about other cultures and peoples and basically slandering them in her writing. Even worse, she fills our heads with untrue stereotypes that people from these countries have to confront when they are in our country. View all 8 comments.

Oct 18, Renee rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: anyone interested in role of women in Islam. Shelves: biography , bookclub , islam. Princess , by Jean Sasson is the life story of a Saudi princess as told to an American journalist. It details the dysfunction, hypocrisy and imposed inertia of the royal family in general, and depravity of some members in particular.

On a personal note, if I thought the Saudis were a bunch of troglodyte degenerates before, Princess , by Jean Sasson is the life story of a Saudi princess as told to an American journalist. On a personal note, if I thought the Saudis were a bunch of troglodyte degenerates before, this book only reinforced that impression.

I say she was just telling her own story as a royal woman living under those specific rules. She also states that if change is going to happen, it would be provoked by middle class women, thus declaring that there are differences in society dynamics. View 1 comment. This is truly a fabulous book about the life and family of Princess Sultana. It has a touch of humour, despite the suffering. Very defiant and is certainly eye opening in a way we could never imagine. This book had the true Arab feel to it. It makes you want to learn more about the Saudi Arabia culture and their royal family.

This is the story of Princess Sultana, a Saudi princess, living a life of extreme wealth and yet experiencing poverty within the realm of freedom and equality. Princess Sul This is truly a fabulous book about the life and family of Princess Sultana.

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Princess Sultana reveals the darker side of the lives of many women in Saudi. I have to admit there were some parts that's difficult to read. There were some terrifying revelations about young women of barely fourteen being stoned to death, drowned in the house swimming pool with weights tied to them, etc.

The horrifying details of the women's plights and Sultana's rebellion about the situation make for an emotional read. This is such a gripping book and will definitely make you laugh, sad, angry and relieved. A highly recommended read. View all 3 comments. Oct 22, Debarati rated it really liked it Recommends it for: all. I seriously dont know if the book is fiction or non-fiction. But few months after reading the book I saw an interview of some Arabian princess on a news channel. The incidents she shared sounded so same to the book.

It talks about the kind of life women lead in Saudi Arabia. It discloses some shocking facts like a young girl stoned to death and a girl child was married to a man of 50's. The life of a princess in Arab is only about gold and dimonds but when it comes to self respect and love, she I seriously dont know if the book is fiction or non-fiction. The life of a princess in Arab is only about gold and dimonds but when it comes to self respect and love, she gets none.

Oct 07, Jeanette "Astute Crabbist" rated it liked it Shelves: middle-east , nonfiction , biography-memoir. The reality for most women there is so much worse. She does mention some examples of what happened to other women, but her tone is often self-pitying.

Her life of leisure was a dream compared to the lives of most Saudi women. Here's what filled her days: "Since the servants fed the 3. Here's what filled her days: "Since the servants fed the children their morning meal and organized their days, I generally slept until noon. After a snack of fresh fruits, I would soak in the tub in a leisurely manner.

After dressing, I would join Kareem for a late lunch. We would lounge and read after our meal, and then Kareem and I would take a short nap I attended women's parties in the late afternoon We almost always attended a dinner party in the evenings, for we were of a most select group that entertained mixed couples Such a hard life. And when things were at their worst, you had unlimited financial resources and gullible private plane pilots at your disposal so you could run away undetected, taking your children with you. If life there is so bad, why did you go back after escaping so successfully?

I did find the book to be an interesting peek into the lives of the Saudi royals, but I wouldn't read the follow-up books. Sultana's friend Jean Sasson writes well enough, but she makes a lot of errors in language usage that should have been caught by editors.

For example, she uses "restrain" when she means "refrain," and "my duplicity of the pilot" instead of " toward the pilot. View all 5 comments. Jul 18, Cheri added it. As a woman who has traveled to Saudi Arabia and having worn the veil; I have to admit, when I read the stories of these women Jean Sasson writes of, I now feel--looking back on wearing the veil--that I was somehow an imposter I can't explain it any better than that when comparing my life with the lives of these women. My wearing the veil was only compulsory when I went outside the confines of the base on which I was stationed; to these women it is a way of life.

I couldn't help but feel that n As a woman who has traveled to Saudi Arabia and having worn the veil; I have to admit, when I read the stories of these women Jean Sasson writes of, I now feel--looking back on wearing the veil--that I was somehow an imposter I can't explain it any better than that when comparing my life with the lives of these women. I couldn't help but feel that not only are their faces hidden behind these veils, but so are the lives they live And I thought it ironic that It is the women's urges and desires their husbands, fathers, and brothers wish to control and suppress Apr 19, Sara M.

I had a few "that-can't-be-true" moments and I really wished that it wasn't a true story, bc knowing that those acts against women are real and are happening now and are not just history is simply heartbreaking. I really liked this book although I wished for a better happy ending.

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View 2 comments. Oct 17, Lally rated it did not like it. This book was terrible. Terribly written, edited terribly, and I have serious reservations over the authenticity of this book. While I do not question that women are treated very poorly in Saudi Arabia and several other Middle Eastern countries, I have a hard time believing that this 'autobiography by proxy' is true.

When I picked up this book, the quick internet research I did brought up the pettiness between Jean Sasson and her would-be plagiarism victim and I find it hard to respect an author This book was terrible. When I picked up this book, the quick internet research I did brought up the pettiness between Jean Sasson and her would-be plagiarism victim and I find it hard to respect an author that endeavors in internet warfare like a middle-school version of "Gossip Girls".

If this woman, "Sultana", is such a prominent figure in Saudi Arabian royalty, I think it would be relatively easy to figure out her true identity. And there, she'd immediately be put to death, at least according to the book, and guess what? The media would find out about it! Jan 10, Sue rated it it was amazing. This is the real handmaid's tale. First published in , it has been reissued in paperback. While some of the facts cited about women's lives in Saudi Arabia may have changed since then, most of the story is still, unfortunately, true.

Not an easy book to read, but one that gives voice to a whole group of women you never hear from. Aug 07, A'ishah rated it did not like it Shelves: at-school. This book is pure fiction. I do not say that just because I am a Muslim from Saudi Arabia. I'm saying it because it is true. My three main problems are: 1. For starters, how does someone just "traveling" to Saudi Arabia just happen to befriend a princess and extract the many details of her life in this book? She's a princess, not a woman on the street, who would still be much mor This book is pure fiction.

She's a princess, not a woman on the street, who would still be much more private about intimate details of her life. She conveniently has to rename the princess for "safety. How could these details be so vivid and how could someone within the royal family not know who it was? She could easily be prosecuted. The language used is archaic and unrealistic. A lot of Westerners are of the opinion that Arabs speak like the characters in the "Arabian Nights.

Conclusion:This book is fiction masquerading as an autobiography. It reads like trash, and the main character is incredibly hard to sympathize with, as she is ungrateful and a spoiled feminist. Apr 13, Irina Garaeva rated it did not like it. A very questionable book. How can it be true and still be published if Saudi is such a strict and even ferocious country?

How can this princess and the writer still be alive? There are facts that she mentioned - she can not hide from the Royal family : And all these awful men actions that are described there: sure, there are a lot of restrictions of women rights in Saudi but living here I can't say that local women feel abused and miserable.

Of course it depends on family, but lot of them can A very questionable book. Of course it depends on family, but lot of them can develop and even work if they want. And where the remarkable events of Saudi history? They should have influenced the life of the princess for sure! It's a pity that those who have never been here will most likely believe it : And don't read it if you have to go to Saudi - you will be scared for nothing. Apr 06, Suzannah added it Shelves: non-fiction , biography. Years ago I read Bojidar Marinov's article "Civilisation and Self-Control" , which agreed with, and expanded upon, some things I'd already read on Islamic views of sexuality.

It's the kind of article that sums up some startling insights in a very concise way, and as a result I never felt I really understood it. Until I read this book. Princess , by Jean Sasson, purports to be the memoir of an anonymous woman from the Saudi royal family, passionate about changing the oppressed status of women in her Years ago I read Bojidar Marinov's article "Civilisation and Self-Control" , which agreed with, and expanded upon, some things I'd already read on Islamic views of sexuality.

Princess , by Jean Sasson, purports to be the memoir of an anonymous woman from the Saudi royal family, passionate about changing the oppressed status of women in her country. First off, this book is actually terrifying - it nearly gave me nightmares. Once again, while reading the memoir of women in repressive Islamic regimes, I found myself thinking "Who needs dystopian fiction? By the end of the book, Princess Sultana reflects sadly that there is not a single man in her life whom she is able to trust or respect. I'm profoundly grateful that this is not true of me. Amidst all my sorrow and anger while reading this book, I am more convinced than ever that what the oppressed women of the world truly need is not feminism, but the Gospel.

As Sultana reflects after winning a major battle, "I had found that there is little joy derived from forcing a man to do what is right. It can build schools, but it cannot transform people. It can preach equality, it can try to impose equality, but it can't make a man delight to lay down his life for his wife and daughters. Sultana speaks of the hypocrisy of her country, where young girls can be stoned to death for fornication after having been raped, or where the wealthy enjoy expensive alcohol while upholding a regime that outlaws it.

Feminism simply does not have the power to change individuals, much less cultures. The most it can do is replace one kind of hypocrisy with another, and only when it is in a position of cultural power. What's needed is someone with the power to retake the world with a mustard seed, with a pebble, with a grain of yeast. What's needed is someone with the power to kill a man and then make him a whole new creation - and nothing less will do: Sultana is, in a way, right when she says, "this grotesque disease of preeminence lives in the sperm of all men and is passed along, generation to generation.

What's needed is Jesus. View all 4 comments. Aug 08, Anum rated it liked it Shelves: 3-stars-not-bad , non-fiction , biographies. Hypocrisy rules the land of the religion that strongly condemned the act the act of hypocrisy centuries ago! The true story of one of the princesses of the royal house of Al Saud in Saudi Arabia is told in a fashion that is both charming and riveting. The veil that guards the women of the Saudi Arabia also hides behind it years of cruelty and injustice.

It was a very strange experience to read this book. It appears highly prophetic to find out that the very people who call themselves the keepers o Hypocrisy rules the land of the religion that strongly condemned the act the act of hypocrisy centuries ago! It appears highly prophetic to find out that the very people who call themselves the keepers of the faith consider themselves above it.

They seem to be guarding their own follies from the eyes of world rather than guarding themselves against the temptations and evils that may lead them astray. The many atrocities mentioned as to have been committed in the name of faith and Islam has no basis in it at all. For example, the case of the young girl who was punished by death for fornication right after giving birth was a very high act of injustice. I am sure as those teenage boys had no access to such witnesses considering the girl was completely innocent, her death was not a punishment but instead would be deemed as murder.

It is sad to see that the name of the religion which holds the honour of a woman more precious is being used to guard the false honour of the hypocritical men of the Saudi society. Islam remains misconstrued and misinterpreted even among the people who speak the language of its holy book. A prime example of this is the treatment of maids as slaves by some of the families.

Considering slavery was outlawed by the mutual agreement of all nations the laws concerning the slaves no longer apply. However, even if one was to ponder over the matter, countless accounts throughout the lives of the Prophet and early converts shows that kindness and compassion was preached in their treatment instead of cruelty and violence. Freeing of slaves, whether Muslim or otherwise, was considered a great act of humanity. Moreover, the purchasing of a slave and hiring of maid are two very different things. In Warner Brothers purchased the film rights for an adaptation.

As of , it was still in development. The book opens with news accounts of the murder of Brenda Lafferty and her infant daughter Erica. Brenda was married to Allen Lafferty, the youngest of the Lafferty brothers. Both men's extremism reached new heights when they became members of the School of the Prophets, founded and led by Robert C. After joining this group, Ron claimed that God had sent him revelations about Brenda.

After other members of the School failed to honor Ron's removal revelation, the brothers quit the School. Dan claimed that he slit both of the victims' throats.


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But, at the trial, Chip Carnes, who was riding in the getaway car, testified that Ron said that he had killed Brenda, [2] and that Ron had thanked his brother for "doing the baby. After the murders, the police found the written "revelation" concerning Brenda and Erica. The press widely reported that Ron had received a revelation to kill the mother and child.

Afterward, the Lafferty brothers conducted a recorded press conference at which Ron said that the "revelation" was not addressed to him, but to "Todd" [a drifter whom Ron had befriended while working in Wichita, Kansas] and that the revelation called only for "removal" of Brenda and her baby, and did not use the word "kill.

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After opening with the Lafferty case, Krakauer explores the history of Mormonism, starting with the early life of Joseph Smith , founder and first prophet of the Latter Day Saint movement. He follows his life from a criminal fraud trial to leading the first followers to Jackson County, Missouri , and Nauvoo, Illinois.

While violence seemed to accompany the Mormons, Krakauer notes that they did not necessarily initiate it. Early Mormons faced severe religious persecution from mainstream Protestant Christians, due to their unorthodox beliefs, including polygamy. In addition they tended to conduct business and personal relations only with other Mormons. There were violent clashes between Mormons and non-Mormons, culminating in Smith's death on June 27, A mob shot him, pulling him from jail in Carthage, Illinois , where he was awaiting trial for destroying the printing press of a local publication that had portrayed him negatively.

From Nauvoo, the Mormons trekked westward to modern-day Utah , led by Smith's successor Brigham Young after some controversy. Arriving in what they called Deseret , many Mormons believed they would be left alone by the United States government, as the territory was then part of Mexico. Soon after their arrival, the Mexican—American War occurred, with Mexico's eventual defeat. Smith's highly controversial revelation of plural marriage threatened to split apart followers of the faith.

The Utah Territory was a theocracy ruled by Brigham Young, and Utah was denied statehood for 50 years due to the Mormons' practice of polygamy. Finally, on September 23, , Wilford Woodruff , the fourth president of LDS Church, officially banned the practice of polygamy after having received a revelation from God. Six years later, Utah was granted statehood. After the Woodruff Manifesto, some members broke away from the mainstream church to form what eventually became the FLDS Church, the most popular group of fundamentalist Mormonism.

He examines the Mountain Meadows massacre during the Utah War, in which Mormons and some local Paiute Indians rounded up and murdered approximately members of the Baker—Fancher party of emigrants passing through their territory. The Mormons went to great lengths to conceal their part in the massacre including dressing as the Paiute and painting their faces in similar fashion. The Civil War interrupted investigations of the events, and no one was indicted until , when nine men were charged. For nearly two decades the falsehood held that the massacre was due solely to the Paiute. The only person ever convicted in the affair was John D.

Lee , a member of the LDS Church. He was convicted and executed by the state in for his role in the crime. Krakauer cites information gleaned from several interviews with Dan Lafferty and former and current members of the Crossfield School of the Prophets, as well as other fundamentalist Mormons.