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Articles

  1. Tipps zum Glücklichsein aus Norwegen
  2. Türkische Migranten hoffen auf muslimische Mehrheit
  3. Portal:Migration und Integration/Artikel des Monats – Wikipedia
  4. Länderprofile Migration: Daten - Geschichte - Politik
  5. Für viele steht der Islam über dem Grundgesetz

In addition to that, our organisation is financed by state funding and private donations. People from different cultures meet regularly at eye level to learn from each other and to appreciate each others diversity. All our community events are free of charge. Our network already includes intercultural communities in over 30 cities, which we call 'satellites'.

Also there, we bring together people form different cultures in culinary, creative and sporting events and promote sustainable friendship building. In doing so, we actively promote the emergence of an open and tolerant society. In the Kitchen Hub, we encourage face-to-face encounters between the local community and refugees - we cook, work, reflect and spend time together.

In this shared space, cultural diversity is tangible; beyond prejudices and media images, the Kitchen Hub offers people the opportunity to learn from one another and discover new cultures. In cooperation with the Habitat Unit department of the Technical University of Berlin and the organisation CoCoon , the Kitchen Hub was planned and actualized by an intercultural team of teachers, refugees and students. Es wurde bunt gekocht, getanzt, geredet und gelacht.

Die Markthalle IX in Kreuzberg. Die beiden Syrer sind vor wenigen Monaten aus Damaskus geflohen. Mzkin hatte sein eigenes Restaurant, Azad ist gelernter Koch. Rumsitzen und abwarten ist nicht ihr Ding, sie wollen in der neuen Heimat ankommen.

Tipps zum Glücklichsein aus Norwegen

How it works With the earnings of our cookbooks and cooking classes we support our non-profit association. More about us Locations. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Esther Bernsen 1. Vorstand Koordination Satelliten Netzwerk. Noor Edres Projektleitung Building Bridges. Hameed Khasawnih Projektleitung Satelliten Netzwerk. Eva Kese Projektleitung Job Buddies. Ina Peppersack 2. Hussam Albaba Ehrenamts- und Community Management.

Abo Hiba Humorvoller Hobbykoch aus Syrien. Mudar Leidenschaftlicher Koch und Arabischlehrer. Ghaith Experimentierfreudiger Koch und Architekturstudent. Khaled Hobbykoch aus Syrien. Stand Januar Sponsor InselGarten. Sponsor Satellites program. Designer of our monthly flyer. Multikulti so lecker wie nie Integrarsi cucinando Arbeiten am sozialen Kontakt Kitchen on the Run startete in Jena-Lobeda Vereint im Verein 1. Viele Wege, ein Ziel: gemeinsam zum Miteinander Liebe geht durch den Magen 1. Kochbananen und Schnitzel. Food Matters: A Seat at the Table Integration geht durch den Magen Neugier geht durch den Magen 5.

In Berlin, communal cooking is filling a gap for refugees Eine Prise Heimat aus Afghanistan Interkulturelles Kochbuch Aktion sinnvollschenken 1. Gemeinsames Kochen verbindet 2.

Türkische Migranten hoffen auf muslimische Mehrheit

Eine Prise Heimat - Wir kochen das! Zusammen speisen dient der Integration 1. They say that Salafism is the new youth culture for Muslims in Germany. That was not always the case. When we were really young we only wanted one thing: to be free. We loved our Turkish, Arab, or Kurdish culture, our Islamic, Alevi, our Maghreb, Afghan and Anatolian traditions — but we wanted to express them on our own terms — as they are in a modern society.

Every summer we wanted to go to swimming pools; we wanted to go to clubs that, at 16, we were not actually allowed to go to; we wanted to go to the cinema with boys or girls; we wanted to be able to call our crush; we wanted to have a real relationship, and introduce him or her to our parents at home — just like our German friends did. We wanted to be young, we wanted to be free. Since we had strict parents, regardless of whether we were Alevi, Sunni, Arabic, or Kurdish, we — especially girls — had to hide much of our lives. And that was not easy. When we were heartbroken we locked ourselves up in our rooms and we could not talk to our parents about it.

We looked for ways to get out of the house in the evenings — we begged our parents for every hour that we spent away from home. We did not want to give in; we wanted to break through the prevailing social norms.

In the days before mobile phones, the guys always had coins in their hands to call us on our home phone, in the hope that we would pick up and they would hear our voices, and not one of our parents. We wrote love letters and painstakingly hid them at home. We girls thought about what it would be like if we were lesbian — without our parents noticing it. We could have spent as much time with our long-term girlfriend as we wanted — she could hang out at our house, go on holiday with us and we could even move in together after finishing school. We spent a lot of time dreaming.

We also dreamt about what life would be like for the next generations. We often asked ourselves whether they would have more freedom than us. We hoped so.


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We just wanted to be young. What was possible for the Germans was not possible for us.

We never rejected their values. We were just annoyed that the Germans did so little with their freedom. We would have done more with it. Then some of us noticed that there was no ray of hope, that they were simply punished if they broke the prevailing social norms of the Muslim communities. That was when you started to conform. Conform to the expectations of your parents. And your youth was over. Whilst our parents, our aunts and uncles had been socialized in Turkey, Morocco, Afghanistan and Algeria, and always felt strongly connected to their homeland, their traditions and norms — this was no longer the natural course for us.

We were overwhelmed; not only with homework and visits from our loving relatives, not only with the summer holidays in our Middle Eastern homelands where we were also stigmatized and harassed, but also with helping our parents with translations with German authorities — but also something more, we were overwhelmed with explaining, justifying and excusing ourselves. This injustice hurt the most. In our hearts, we felt a twinge every time we realized the limits which came too close to our dreams.

We lived in fear. Fear of being caught. Fear of being punished.


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Fear of what reproaches we would be confronted with this time. We wanted to be free. We had created our own world. We became friends because of our cultural identity, because we had our own different cultures — starting at school, where we came into contact with the German middle class and so did not have much to do with our cosmopolitan and transnational identity. And it was not our religion which was our identity. It was our common goal, our pursuit of freedom, of acceptance, of recognition. From our own community as well as from the German world.

But we realized that it did not bother us. It turned out that not only in maths and physics, but also in ethics, history and German, our grades were much better than those whose grandfathers had been doctors or teachers. We listened to Hip Hop, we loved Pharrel Williams — long before the middle-class students did. We mourned for Tupac and Aaliyah. We knew American slang and so we chose to study advanced English.

Portal:Migration und Integration/Artikel des Monats – Wikipedia

That was our youth. We had very few role models in the German media or in the public eye to show us a way to reconcile the expectations of our parents and our community with the expectations of society. We did not feel like victims, but we were marginalized and at some point this made us into victims. We never got to grips with Islam or the Koran — like perhaps our parents did.

We fasted during Ramadan and celebrated the religious festivals. With a really bad conscience we took time off school — since our parents did not want us to miss school for Eid. They did not want us to be primarily religious — but always practising. And if we managed to, we wanted to graduate from school, we wanted to study, we wanted to get out into the world. That was our world. And we hoped that the next generation would lead lives which were even more open, free, and modern. That the next generation would break down social norms.

We did not just want to consume a modern lifestyle, with our Reebok shoes, Nokia phones and Nike trousers. We wanted all the other things which went alongside. We tried to imitate Jennifer Lopez. Our parents always trusted German boys more than the sons of their friends and acquaintances.

Länderprofile Migration: Daten - Geschichte - Politik

They just broke out and disappeared because they could no longer cope with the strict rules of their parents and brothers — and when our own parents saw this happening, they panicked. And they suffocated us even more with their love and their fear. We did not want to be primarily Muslim. We wanted to be young. But we noticed that it was becoming difficult for society to accept us for who we were when our identities were so complex.

We never wanted to live lives of conformity. But our struggle for freedom was not seen, recognized or rewarded. At some point they began to see us in categories. We had to fight these stereotypes. We were labelled as Germans, although we felt that we were not even accepted as foreigners. Neither by the Germans nor by the foreigners. We were dragged back and forth. Not between tradition and modernity — because we had already decided on modernity — but between the different labels that were given to us.

From now on we would be German Muslims. We had a migrant background. We had to be understood. We had to be tolerated. Almost no one asked us who or what we wanted to be. Allgemein 9 Comments. What has changed? It is the shit we grew up with that made us to talented rappers The path of life for young men with a migration story growing up in socially weak districts, their way to criminality and their inner struggle is the essence of the new generation of German rap.

Are there any moments, in which you feel excluded? When everybody comes fresh from home and I come from anywhere laughing … then I feel excluded. Abdi: I am talking of few days ago. Watching cartoons? Abdi: Yes, watching cartoons. Of course. Celo: Do you see us as cartoon characters?

Abdi: No, no, she says, watching cartoons means escaping from reality. Is there anything what your parents tell you to do or not do do? Abdi: Come home, where have you been, do not spend all of your money, what is about this receipt? Why do you sleep in hotels? Do not sleep in hotels, do not spend all your money, bring less receipts home, save your money, think about your future, do you have a pension insurance? These kind of things. Credit: Ondro. Allgemein 2 Comments. Hier geht es zur deutschen Version They say that Salafism is the new youth culture for Muslims in Germany.

We never missed out on love, but we often missed out on freedom.

Für viele steht der Islam über dem Grundgesetz

And we fought for it. In the end the boundaries became blurred Whilst our parents, our aunts and uncles had been socialized in Turkey, Morocco, Afghanistan and Algeria, and always felt strongly connected to their homeland, their traditions and norms — this was no longer the natural course for us. We had to constantly apologize for who we were and what we wanted to be. We were newcomers.